Museums trade duck pics in viral twitter stunt

Museums are going viral on Twitter by sharing their best “duck pics”.

Prompted by the Museum of English Rural Life to “give us your best duck,” museums around the world are sharing pictures of their duck-related artefacts.

Replies came from museums and art galleries around the world:

Some had a more unique interpretation of the challenge:

As the MERL summed up:

Museums on social media

Last year, Museums in the UK celebrated ‘Museum Meme Day’ by posting captioned pictures of their artefacts on Twitter.

Many of the Twitter accounts behind popular UK museums posted a meme related to art, history and even the people that visit. It follows a popular trend of Classic Art memes, where pictures of famous artworks were captioned.

VisitEngland recently released data about English attractions and their use of marketing and digital media.

17% of visitor attractions increased their marketing spend in 2017, while 10% decreased. Those that increased tended to be those that saw an increase in visitor numbers, growth predominantly driven by overseas visitors.

93% of attractions have a website, 89% use some form of digital communications (a slight increase on previous years). More than one third have an online booking system, at 37%.

Digital communications appear to be working. The attractions that used them saw a 2% increase in visitors. The attractions that did not saw a 3% decline.

For the second year in a row, Instagram and Pinterest are becoming more in use by visitor attractions. 44% now use the social networks, up from 22% in 2015. However, it does appear that attractions are narrowing in on their social media use – the proportion of sites using “other” social media has more than halved since 2016. This suggests attractions are investing more time into the mainstream social media.

Click here to read the full article.