Bompas & Parr explore behavioural trends in a post-coronavirus world

Bompas & Parr have released a new trend report, Fluid Landscapes, in which they explore behavioural changes as a result of the coronavirus.

In this report, Bompas & Parr look at the behavioural change in humans, both during and after the coronavirus pandemic.  Fluid Landscapes offers an optimistic view of the future, encouraging everyone to take a fresh perspective of the COVID-19 impact and look at the creative impact. It offers ideas on how to respond to this changing world.

Behaviour changes

Bompas& Parr mid-coronavirus report

Bompas & Parr believe that the current behaviour changes forced upon us as a result of lockdown will impact future interactions with people, objects and events.

People might get used being 2m away from people and increasing their hygiene habits. How will this affect events designed for crowds? With a heightened focus on hygiene, will people shun buffet food once this is over?

The new normal

Bompas & Parr want to “thrive, not just survive”. They see the current situation as a chance to “look at things from a different perspective”and usher in a “Golden Era of DIY Creativity”.

Many events are being cancelled, such as the Chelsea Flower Show. But being stuck inside doesn’t mean we need to miss out on everything.  Perhaps Bompas & Parr can encourage people to create an at-home version, filling our gardens and windowsills with flower displays.

A new virtual world is opening up as we learn to interact online with virtual parties, pub quizzes, film nights and spas with a “Sanitiser Somelier”.

As food futurists, Bompas & Parr are exploring the ways in which isolated eating can be a pathway into the psyche. They are developing “a psychological tasting menu that will allow us to give those stuck at home a taste of the unimagined”.

Adapting to a new world – Rehabilitating touch

Bompas & Parr post coronavirus life

After a significant period of time in lockdown with limited physical contact with other people, will we need to rehabilitate touch when this is over? Bompas & Parr explain that touch is incredibly important, as it releases oxytocin, a ‘feel-good’ hormone.

Bompas & Parr predicts a Haptics Museum will be built to take visitors on a sensory haptics tour. Unlike traditional museums, guests will be encouraged to engage and touch objects. This will help rehabilitate people with the sensory delights of touch.

Although people will be cautious at first of leaving their safe world of isolation, eventually they will crave social activities. With frequent comparisons to WWII, will there be street parties of celebration once lockdowns are lifted? Bompas & Parr even see the possibility of having sponsored street parties.

And finally, continuing the comparison of the current fight against COVID-19 to wartime, will we see memoirs and memorials in a post-coronavirus world?

Download the Fluid Landscapes report here.

Bompas & Parr recently announced a hand sanitiser design competition, with the designs being displayed at the Design Museum.