Heartmatch app is the Tinder of artworks at the High Museum of Art

The High Museum of Art has launched a Tinder-style app for art, Heartmatch, which allows users to swipe right and swipe left on artworks they like or don’t like.

The museum in Atlanta, Georgia launched the app on Valentine’s Day this year, in a bid to connect visitors with its new galleries using mobile technology.

The app functions in three ways – to show visitors the diversity of the High Museum of Art’s collection, to direct guests to the artworks they like, and to collect data on visitors.

Heartmatch features around 100 artworks, which take approximately five minutes to swipe through. But not before the app asks users: ‘Ready to fall in love?’

Swipe right on art you like, and left on art you don’t

Once visitors have chosen the artworks they like, the app provides them with a customised map showing where the artworks are displayed in the museum, so that visitors can go and view them in person.

As users swipe, the app prompts them every few images, suggesting: “Maybe you would like me better if you saw me in person.”

Users can access the app from anywhere – at home or in the museum – and can email the map to themselves before visiting.

Heartmatch also encourages guests to take a selfie with their match, or matches, and share them with the hashtag #highmuseum.

Art galleries and museums utilise mobile technology

Art galleries and museums are increasingly utilising technology to enhance the visitor experience. Most recently, the Musée du Louvre teamed up with HTC Vive Arts on its first virtual reality (VR) experience – Mona Lisa: Beyond the Glass.

Elsewhere, the Dalí Museum in St Petersburg, Florida is adding exhibits that use artificial intelligence (AI) and augmented reality (AR) as part of its $38 million expansion.

In Amsterdam, the Mauritshuis museum and Nationale-Nederlanden are using AR to bring Rembrandt’s ‘The Anatomy Lesson of Dr Nicolaes Tulp’ to life.

Image: Heartmatch