PGAV Destinations Seeks to Award $3000 in Grant Funding for Pollinator Research

Leading destination design firm, PGAV Destinations, has announced that it is offering a single $3, 000 science grant to help further research into pollinators.

Populations of bees and other pollinators have nosedived in recent years with potentially devastating consequences for the environment, farming and beyond.

“Over the course of the last two decades, we’ve seen habitat loss and other potential causes resulting in bee colony collapse and affecting on other pollinator populations and behaviour, ” said Mike Konzen, Chair and Principal of PGAV Destinations.

“As these birds, insects, and mammals have a foundational effect on world agriculture, medicine, and more, we see this grant as a way to help contribute to the understanding of the problems and potential solutions.”

PGAV Destinations has created experiences across the globe for more than a half century, inspiring curious children and guests to become more scientifically-minded and thoughtful about our world; hopefully, inspired to act.

PGAV Destinations Seeks to Award $3000 to Further Pollinator Research

In that spirit, PGAV Destinations seeks to award $3, 000 in grant funding to support young scientists for museum or laboratory study, fieldwork, or any other activity that forwards our understanding of the negative factors impacting pollinators and/or solutions to address these challenges.

Grant applicants must be U.S.-based and currently enrolled in an advanced degree educational programme. A panel comprised of PGAV staff and St. Louis representatives will review the applications, and a single $3, 000 grant will be awarded to a researcher or research party on Monday, February 6, 2017. Grant applications are due no later than December 31, 2016.

“Each year, the volunteer arm of our organisation – PGAVIA – pursues a central conservation cause to study and support, ” explained Stacey Ludlum, zoological designer and site planner at PGAV and Chair of the PGAVIA committee.

“Last year, we were successful in supporting a bill to ban the illegal sale of ivory for the Missouri State Legislature, and this year has proven a remarkable opportunity to study and help support the critical issues facing pollinators.”