Sector One simulator launched during Monaco Grand Prix with motion from D-BOX Technologies

After more than three years of design, development and testing, RS Simulation launched a high-end racing simulator during the Monaco Grand Prix last Friday, May 24. Keeping users of Sector One on the edge of their seat is a motion system from D-BOX Technologies.

The sophisticated simulator was designed by a team of engineers and professional pilots including Pierre Gasly and Andre Loterrer. Together they set themselves the goal of creating an experience that would please both professional race car drivers and savvy motorsports aficionados.

A hyper-realistic driving experience

Recreating a racing environment, Sector One enables pilots to feel the power and nuance of driving a sports car on a real race track. Meticulous motion coding by D-BOX delivers tactile feedback and hyper-realistic replications of every driving sensation.

“Over the years, our motion technology has been utilised in all types of simulated training environments from aviation to the military,” says D-BOX president and CEO, Claude Mc Master. “We were pleased to work with RS Simulation and help them bring this brand new simulator to life. The extreme accuracy and lifelike motion provided by our motion systems has always been appreciated by the professional pilot community, so Sector One will not disappoint.”

“We needed to work with a company that has proven, sophisticated technology and a strong ability to deliver a hyper-realistic experience,” says William Broussin, a simulation engineer at RS Simulation who founded the Sector One project. “It was only natural that we collaborate with D-BOX.”

D-BOX’s devotion to motion

In addition to simulators, D-BOX Technologies’ motion systems can be found in video games, virtual reality applications and movie theatres. The Canadian company boasts headquarters in Montreal, as well as offices in Los Angeles and Beijing. RS Simulation is based in Monaco, where its existing high end racing simulator lets drivers experience over 100 different circuits.