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First images released of Quentin Blake Centre for Illustration

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quentin blake centre for illlustration

The first images of Tim Ronalds Architects’ competition-winning proposal for the Quentin Blake Centre for Illustration have been unveiled. The $8 million centre is opening in London in 2022.

The Quentin Blake Centre for Illustration will be the world’s largest public arts space dedicated to illustration, and is due to open in autumn 2022.

Tim Ronalds Architects beat five rival shortlisted teams to win the commission to design the Quentin Blake Centre for Illustration.

The House of Illustration, which was founded by Sir Quentin Blake in 2014, will close in King’s Cross. It will relocate and be renamed the Quentin Blake Centre for Illustration.

Quentin Blake Centre starts building work in 2021

quentin blake centre for illlustration
Tim Ronalds Architects

The Quentin Blake Centre for Illustration will feature exhibition galleries, education studios, events spaces and a shop and cafe.

It will also become a permanent home for the archive of more than 40,000 items of Quentin Blake, who said: “It is going to be amazing.”

“I am enormously proud to have my name associated with this international home for an art which I know and love, and for artists who speak in a myriad of visual languages, but are understood by all,” said Blake.

The Quentin Blake Centre will be located at the historic New River Head site in Islington, London. The four historic 18th and 19th century industrial buildings will be redeveloped by Tim Ronalds Architects.

The House of Illustration closing in King’s Cross

quentin blake centre for illlustration
Tim Ronalds Architects

Work on repurposing the industrial buildings will begin in June 2021. House of Illustration has already raised over £3 million of its £8 million target.

Olivia Ahmad, artistic director of House of Illustration, said: “We are thrilled to be embarking on a project that will secure a permanent and much-needed public centre for illustration and graphics in the UK and a home for Sir Quentin’s archive.”

“We look forward to expanding and developing our pioneering work that explores the importance of graphic art in our lives, supports emerging creators and empowers people of all ages to use visual communication,” added Ahmad.

Meanwhile, the Roald Dahl Museum has been compiling fun activities and a wide range of resources during the coronavirus crisis.

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Bea Mitchell

A journalist specialising in entertainment and attractions, Bea loves theme parks (mainly Disney) and is particularly interested in things of a gothic, horror or fantasy nature.

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