Museum of Science, Boston receives $10m from MathWorks for new STEM exhibit

The Museum of Science, Boston has received a $10 million gift from leading mathematical computing software developer MathWorks to fund a new permanent technology and engineering exhibit.

The exhibit, set to open in 2020, is part of the transformation of the 100,000-square foot Blue Wing.

The Museum of Science, Boston introduces more than 1.5 million visitors a year to STEM (science, technology, engineering and math).  The Museum’s National Center for Technological Literacy® K-12 curricula, including its award-winning Engineering is Elementary®, have reached an estimated 13 million students and 129,700 educators.

One of the Museum’s key programs, Engineering Design Challenges, will be the at the core of the new exhibit.  There will be a particular emphasis on engaging girls, women and families with young children with the interactive content. In working to solve challenges, visitors will have to use many of the skills that engineers and computer scientists use day-to-day, including creativity, collaboration and learning from failure.

Ioannis Miaoulis, president and director of the Museum of Science, said, “Expanding upon years of support and partnership from MathWorks, this generous gift demonstrates the close alignment of our missions, values, and commitment to inspiring the next generation of scientists and engineers as they create solutions, investigate questions and imagine possible worlds for both today and tomorrow.  We’re grateful to have a partner like MathWorks that supports our vision to transform the Blue Wing into a state-of-the-art, integrated experience that excites, empowers, and engages everyone to be the critical thinkers needed to shape our technological future.”

MathWorks has been an active supporter of the Museum since 1991, providing sponsorship and volunteers from the company’s staff to support engineering and computer science events.

“MathWorks is committed to helping students discover their passion for STEM subjects. To complement classroom learning, they need to experience working hands-on to explore, experiment, model and build.  The Museum of Science shares in this approach to education, and we are very happy to expand our partnership through the Blue Wing transformation and creation of the MathWorks exhibit,” said MathWorks CEO Jack Little.

Images and video: Museum of Science, Boston